Tree Planting Up In Southern Pine Belt; Down Somewhat In Other Regions

A new survey by the U.S. Forest Service reports that tree planting across the southern pine region of the nation was up 5 percent in the 2012-13 planting season but down slightly in most other forested areas of the nation.

The estimated number of acres planted to conifer species—mostly a variety of trees, largely pine, that produce needles—totaled some 2.1 million during the fall to spring 2012/13 planting season.  That was down by about three percent from the estimated seedlings planted during the prior 2011/12 season.

But while the tree-planting numbers overall  were down narrowly nationwide, they were up significantly in the two groups of states that together comprise what is generally referred to as the nation’s pine belt: 13 states in the southeast and south central areas.  Together, these two groups of states accounted for 76 percent of tree seedlings planted in 2012 and 82 percent in 2013.

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